Student Work

Finding common ground in a Brooklyn kitchen, a group of political asylees work towards a future in the restaurant business. A film by Doc ‘17 students Thea Piltzecker and Liz Scherffius. A Table For All

Data and investigative students from the ’17 M.S. class worked with Univision on an investigation of the Trump Organization’s international business. Their findings: 15 of 27 international Trump-branded real-estate projects include developers or investors who have faced criminal allegations, including corruption, fraud, and drug trafficking. 

Four students from the ’16 M.S. Stabile class reported on how wealthy politicians and businessmen suspected of corruption in their native lands are fleeing to the U.S., a safe haven where their wealth and influence shield them from arrest. Their report was published by The Miami Herald and ProPublica.

In a collaboration with The New Yorker, students in Prof. Sarah Stillman’s class showed how hundreds of thousands of immigrants are being deported even if they face violence and murder. As a result of these deportations, immigrants have fallen victim to kidnapping, extortion and sexual assault.

 

Mukhtar Ibrahim, ’17 M.S. Stabile, traveled to Kenya to look into how the U.S. government has spent millions of dollars on a controversial counterterrorism program there. He found that the program may have endangered the lives of the people it was supposed to help. His story was published by Buzzfeed.

 

“Syria’s Medicine Underground,” created by students in Dean Steve Coll’s Investigating Armies and Spies class, drew on more than 50 interviews with Syrian doctors, aid workers, refugees, researchers and international officials. A story on Syrian medical workers was also published in Foreign Policy.

 

Karsten Moran for The New York Times

The New York Yankees created a charity to distribute $40 million in cash grants, sports equipment and baseball tickets to community organizations. In a New York Times story, Micah Hauser, ’17 M.S. Stabile, revisited that agreement, and found that the charity has operated with little oversight or public accountability.

 

Students in Prof. Mark Hansen's computational journalism class contributed to "The Follower Factory," a New York Times report on fake accounts in social media networks. It found that some 48 million Twitter accounts may be automated and designed to simulate real people. 

 

CJS '17 grads Manuela Andreoni and Inti Pacheco take us through what started out as a class assignment in data journalism contributed to a The New Yorker story by Adam Davison.

Podcast: Examining Trump's Batumi Deal