Student Work | Columbia Journalism School

Student Work

Woman in cubicle wearing headset: Image via Vox story

For her master's project, Francesca Regalado, '18 M.S. Stabile, looked into working conditions in the Phillippines-based call centers that service Amazon customers in the U.S. Her investigation, published on Vox, found a poorly regulated industry where employees sometimes work 24-hour shifts and face hazardous working conditions.

Man and Child atop Stairs: Image from Documented NY Story

For the Spring 2019 Gender and Migration course, Andrea Salcedo, '19 M.S. Stabile, Cristina Baussan, '19 M.S., and Theodora Yu, '19 M.S., reported on young immigrants affected by the Trump administration's change to the age limit for SIJS, or Special Immigrant Juvenile Status.

Bronx Parks Project at Columbia Journalism School

Students in LynNell Hancock's Reporting course investigated inequity in Bronx parks caused by disparities in public and private funding. The project resulted in a feature on Bronx Ink with 15 news stories and two interactive data maps for public use.

WIRED: Americans Identified by Twitter as Russian Bots

As part of Susan McGregor's Investigative Techniques course, students in the M.S. Data Journalism and Dual M.S. concentrations wrote about Americans banned from Twitter after their accounts were flagged as bots tied to Russia's Internet Research Agency. Their story was published in the July 2018 edition of WIRED.

Bianca Fortis, '19 Stabile M.S.

Bianca Fortis, '19 Stabile M.S., writes for Citylimits.org about the state's requirement that the city pump oxygen into the Newtown Creek, a superfund site in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, to help maintain aquatic life. Critics think the aeration systems installed in the creek may be concerning for public health, because the action pumps bacteria into the air

Data and investigative students from the ’17 M.S. class worked with Univision on an investigation of the Trump Organization’s international business. Their findings: 15 of 27 international Trump-branded real-estate projects include developers or investors who have faced criminal allegations, including corruption, fraud, and drug trafficking. 

Four students from the ’16 M.S. Stabile class reported on how wealthy politicians and businessmen suspected of corruption in their native lands are fleeing to the U.S., a safe haven where their wealth and influence shield them from arrest. Their report was published by The Miami Herald and ProPublica.

In a collaboration with The New Yorker, students in Prof. Sarah Stillman’s class showed how hundreds of thousands of immigrants are being deported even if they face violence and murder. As a result of these deportations, immigrants have fallen victim to kidnapping, extortion and sexual assault.

 

Mukhtar Ibrahim, ’17 M.S. Stabile, traveled to Kenya to look into how the U.S. government has spent millions of dollars on a controversial counterterrorism program there. He found that the program may have endangered the lives of the people it was supposed to help. His story was published by Buzzfeed.

 

“Syria’s Medicine Underground,” created by students in Dean Steve Coll’s Investigating Armies and Spies class, drew on more than 50 interviews with Syrian doctors, aid workers, refugees, researchers and international officials. A story on Syrian medical workers was also published in Foreign Policy.