Knight-Bagehot Fellows

Meet the fellows.

2017-2018 Fellows

Ben Bergman

Ben Bergman, 35, is the senior business/economics reporter at Los Angeles NPR News station, KPCC. He also regularly contributes business stories to national NPR and Marketplace programs and anchors coverage of major breaking news for KPCC. Bergman graduated cum laude with a B.A. in politics from Occidental College in 2004. During his senior year, he interned for The New York Times and CBS Network News. After graduation, he spent the next eight years as a producer for NPR’s Morning Edition.

Samuel Black

Samuel Black, 31, is a journalist who has made award-winning documentaries for film, television, and radio. Most recently he produced investigative documentaries for Fault Lines, Al Jazeera English’s weekly current affairs program. Before that he worked at Alex Gibney’s Jigsaw Productions, where he co-produced feature-length documentaries about subjects including WikiLeaks, Eliot Spitzer, and Jack Abramoff. He has reported stories for This American Life, and was researcher on HBO’s feature film Too Big To Fail. A graduate of Yale University, he is the recipient of numerous prizes, including an Overseas Press Club Award for best international reporting dealing with human rights.

Matt Jarzemsky

Matt Jarzemsky, 31, is a reporter for The Wall Street Journal, covering private equity, bankruptcy and equity capital markets since 2013. He joined Dow Jones Newswires as a reporter in 2011. Previously, he covered commercial real estate for Institutional Investor News and interned for Bloomberg News on its markets desk. He has a journalism degree from University of Missouri-Columbia.

Matthew Kish

Matthew Kish, 41, reporter for the Portland Business Journal, covers sportswear, banking and general assignment news for this weekly business newspaper published by American City Business Journals. The winner of seven SABEW awards, his investigation about Oregon’s emergence as a hotbed for shell company abuse prompted the secretary of state to develop legislation to address the problem. He has reported for the Indianapolis Business Journal and The Arizona Republic, among others. He graduated summa cum laude from Ohio Dominican College, earned a master’s degree from Reed College, and teaches news writing and reporting at the University of Portland.

Karen Langley

Karen Langley, 30, is a state Capitol reporter for the Pittsburgh Post-Gazette, where she covers Pennsylvania’s governor and legislature, annual state budgets and public pension debates. As a student at the University of Notre Dame, where she graduated cum laude in 2008, she wrote and edited for the student-run daily newspaper, The Observer. She went on to intern at The Philadelphia Inquirer and then joined the Concord (N.H.) Monitor, where she worked as a reporter for three years before moving to Harrisburg, Pa.

Jonnelle Marte

Jonnelle Marte, 30, is lead writer for the personal finance section of The Washington Post. Before joining the Post in 2014, she was a reporter for Marketwatch, WSJ Digital Network and Wall Street Journal Sunday.  As a student at Florida International University, from which she graduated cum laude in 2008, she interned at the St. Petersburg Times, the Detroit News and the Boston Globe. She also worked for four years as a metro reporter for the Miami Herald.

A. Humeyra Pamuk

A. Humeyra Pamuk, 36, started working for Reuters in 2002, while studying at Galatasaray University in Turkey for an M.A. in European Union Studies.; currently she serves as a senior correspondent for Reuters based in Istanbul. In her nearly 15 years at Reuters, she has worked out of London, Cairo and Dubai, covering everything from commodities and energy markets to Turkey’s failed coup, and has reported from hostile environments such as Syria and Iraq. She holds a B.A. in International Relations from Koc University.

Hindol Sengupta

Hindol Sengupta, 37, joined Fortune India in 2010; as Editor-at-Large for the Indian edition of Fortune, he writes from Delhi on political economy. He has worked at CNBC-TV18, CNN-IBN and Bloomberg TV (India), and is the author of seven books. Among his three upcoming books is a history of the Indian free market by Simon & Schuster. He was declared a Young Global Leader by the World Economic Forum in 2017 and has been short-listed for the Hayek Book Prize given by the Manhattan Institute for economic writing in memory of the Nobel laureate economist F. A. Hayek.

Brian Spegele, 29, has been a Wall Street Journal reporter in China since 2011, documenting China’s slowing economy and its disruptions on the global energy sector. A graduate of Indiana University, where he majored in journalism and international studies and minored in Chinese language, he interned at the St. Petersburg Times before joining the Journal.

Andrea Wong, 28, has covered the dollar and U.S. Treasury market for Bloomberg since 2013. Her investigation on the secret Treasury holdings of Saudi Arabia led the U.S. Treasury Department to disclose the kingdom’s data for the first time in four decades. A graduate of Hong Kong Baptist University, she joined Bloomberg as an intern in 2010, and for three years covered the financial markets of China and Taiwan, with a focus on currencies and government bonds.

2016-2017 Fellows

Tim J. Craig, 40, is Afghanistan-Pakistan bureau chief for The Washington Post. In his 13 years at the Post, he covered local and state government in Maryland, Virginia and Washington D.C., before moving to Pakistan as bureau chief in 2013, where he covers the struggle against terrorism and how residents of both Pakistan and Afghanistan cope with war and economic uncertainty. He began his career as a reporter for The Baltimore Sun in 1999, after graduating from Gannon University with a B.A. in Communications English.

Edward Krudy, 39, joined Reuters in 2009 as a stock market reporter, going on to lead the Wall Street team for two years. Since 2013 he has been covering state and local government and municipal finance with a recent focus on Puerto Rico's debt crisis. British-Hungarian, he graduated with a B.A. in East European languages and regional studies from University College London in 2001 and an M.A. in history from the Central European University in Budapest in 2004. In 2007, he set up Thomson Financial's Budapest bureau ahead of the merger with Reuters, and before that worked for a number of Hungarian and international news organizations, including Interfax Central Europe and Business Hungary.

Stephen Kurczy, 33, is special correspondent for Americas Quarterly, the Latin America-focused magazine and news site published by Americas Society/Council of the Americas. Previously, he was Brazil correspondent for Monitor Global Outlook, a business publication of The Christian Science Monitor, where he was formerly desk editor. He also freelances for Fusion and has contributed to The New Yorker and VICE. After getting his start with The Day newspaper of Connecticut, he reported on staff for The Cambodia Daily and Debtwire, gaining journalism and language experience across three continents. He graduated from Calvin College in 2005.

Douglas MacMillan, 32, based in San Francisco, has been technology reporter for The Wall Street Journal since 2013. He was part of the team that received the 2015 Scripps Howard Award for Business/Economics Reporting for a series of stories exposing new risks in private tech investing. Previously, he covered technology for Bloomberg News and Businessweek. He is the first beat reporter for a major news outlet focused on Uber, Airbnb and other rising tech startups. He graduated in 2005 from Vanderbilt University with a B.A. in English.

Silvana Ordoñez, 26, is a Spanish-language personal finance correspondent and assignment desk producer for CNBC, where she writes, produces and presents CNBC-branded segments in Spanish for Telemundo. Before joining CNBC in 2012 as a news associate, she was a metro reporter for the Miami Herald. She graduated with a Bachelor of Science in Journalism from Florida International University, where she was awarded outstanding journalism student of the year.

Tracey Samuelson, 33, is a New-York based reporter for APM's Marketplace, covering business and economic stories. Recently, her work has focused on the impact of international trade on the U.S. economy and public perception of trade agreements. In addition to Marketplace, her radio stories have appeared on NPR, including Morning Edition, All Things Considered, and the Planet Money podcast, as well as in print for The New York TimesNew York Magazine, and the Christian Science Monitor, among others. She has a B.A. from Williams College and an M.S. in Journalism from Columbia.

Christie Smythe, 33, as legal reporter for Bloomberg LP, covers consumer, banking, white-collar fraud and other business cases in Brooklyn federal court. Prior to joining Bloomberg in 2012, she wrote and edited for Law360.com, an online news service for corporate lawyers. Previously, she was a business reporter for the Cape Cod Times and a real estate reporter for the Arizona Daily Star. She graduated in 2005 with a Bachelor of Journalism from the University of Missouri.

Timothy J. Stenovec, 32, is technology editor for Business Insider's consumer-focused technology site, Tech Insider. He reports, writes and edits stories focused on products, services, apps, streaming media and the future of TV and covers such companies as Apple, Netflix, Amazon, Facebook and Google. Previously, he reported and edited for The Huffington Post and was a reporting intern for The New York Times. He began his career working at a TV station in Colorado. He graduated magna cum laude from Colby College with a B.A. in History and earned earned an M.A. in Journalism from New York University.

Roshanak Taghavi, 34, focuses on U.S. security policy and economics, politics and culture of the MENASA region for Newsweek Middle East. After graduating with a Bachelor of Science in Business from Boston College, she began her journalism career in 2003, reporting on Iranian politics for Egypt's English-language newspaper, Al Ahram Weekly. For two years she was a correspondent for Dow Jones Newswires and The Wall Street Journal and has since freelanced for a variety of news organizations, including Foreign Policy Magazine, The Christian Science Monitor and Al Jazeera English. In 2007, she earned a Master of International Affairs from Columbia University.

John Tozzi, 32, is a health care reporter for Bloomberg.com and Bloomberg Businessweek. Since joining Businessweek magazine in 2008, he has also covered small business and entrepreneurship online and in the print magazine. Previously, he covered community news in Queens for the TimesLedger chain of weekly newspapers. He graduated summa cum laude with a Bachelor of Science in Journalism from Boston University's College of Communication in 2005.

 

2015-2016 Fellows

Justin Doom, 34, is a reporter covering renewable energy for Bloomberg News. As a student at Arizona State University, he worked on the campus daily for seven semesters. He graduated cum laude in 2002. Following graduation, he was a contributing writer for The Arizona Republic and the Arizona Diamondbacks, and wrote a weekly online column for Sports Illustrated. He returned to ASU’s Walter Cronkite School to complete a Master’s degree and work as an adjunct professor teaching courses in editing, reporting and news writing. He first joined Bloomberg as an intern in 2010 and covered finance and later commodities and energy markets.

Kim Gittleson, 28, is a business reporter for BBC News in New York, where she has reported or produced for all of its platforms – radio, television and online –since 2011. She has reported from over 20 U.S. states, the UK, Singapore and elsewhere on economic policy and business trends. In 2008, she graduated cum laude from Harvard University, where she was president of Harvard’s radio station and an editor for the Harvard Crimson. She was a 2008‐2009 Fulbright Fellow in Iasi, Romania. She has been a contributing producer for WNYC and a contributing blogger for GothanSchools.org (now ChalkbeatNY) as a data reporter focusing on New York City charter schools.

Tiffany Hsu, 29, covers the California economy for the Business section of The Los Angeles Times, writing about labor, employment and trade. Previously, she held the retail, restaurants and alternative energy beats, covering data breaches, food safety recalls, minimum wage protests and solar installations. Her coverage of California small business won a “Best in Business” prize from the Society of American Business Editors and Writers in 2014. She graduated from The University of California, Berkeley, in 2007.

Iris Kuo, 29, reports for Argus Media, an international energy wire based in Houston, Texas. Previously, she led green energy investment coverage for the tech news outlet VentureBeat and reported for The Wall Street Journal in Hong Kong. Her work has also appeared in the Houston Chronicle and North Texas Public Radio. Fluent in Chinese, she graduated magna cum laude in 2007 from the University of Texas‐Dallas where she edited the college newspaper. She previously served as the Asian American Journalists Association’s Texas chapter president.

Carolina Mandl, 35, covers the banking industry for Valor Economico, Brazil’s leading business newspaper, where she started in 2002 as a junior reporter covering business and corporate governance. A graduate of Pontificia Universidade Catolica in Sao Paulo and Universidade Federal de Pernambuco’s Center of Applied Social Sciences, she has covered subjects from politics and regional inequality in Brazil to fixed income securities, private equity, fraud and corruption. She attended a program in international affairs at New York University in 2000.

Steven Overly, 26, is a national reporter for The Washington Post, where he writes about federal technology and energy policy. He previously covered the technology, biotechnology and venture capital industries in the Washington metropolitan area. He also serves as an adjunct faculty member at the University of Maryland, from which he graduated in 2010 with a B.A. in journalism. During college, Steven was editor‐in‐chief of the daily student newspaper and spent his summers interning at The Daily Record in Baltimore, The Plain Dealer in Cleveland and the St. Petersburg Times in Tampa.

Jeff Roberts, 38, focuses on technology law and policy for Fortune. A Canadian lawyer‐turned‐journalist, he has contributed to other major newspapers and magazines, including the Globe & Mail, The Economist, The New York Times and Toronto Star. As a staff writer for Reuters, he reported on regulatory and privacy issues; and as a senior reporter for Gigaom and paidContent, he covered media and technology. He earned his law degree from McGill University in 2004 and a Master of Arts from Columbia Journalism School in 2010. He is a member of the Bar in New York and Ontario.

Cory Schouten, 33, is managing editor of Indianapolis Business Journal (IBJ) which he joined as a reporter in 2006. Promoted to his current position in 2013, he manages a staff of 14 reporters and editors and directs news coverage and editorial strategy for print and digital content of IBJ. As a student at Indiana University Bloomington, he interned at Arizona Republic, Indianapolis Star and St. Petersburg Times. Before joining IBJ, he was a reporter for Sarasota Herald‐Tribune. The recipient of numerous journalism awards, he serves as Vice President of the Society of American Business Editors and Writers.

David Trilling, 37, is Central Asia Correspondent for The Economist, and Central Asia Editor for EurasiaNet.org, a news website covering the former Soviet Union. From Bishkek and Moscow, he manages a team of 20 freelance contributors in countries ranked among the most inhospitable for journalists by press‐freedom watchdogs. He graduated from Tufts University in 2000, received a graduate certificate in photojournalism from the International Center of Photography in 2002 and a Master of International Affairs from Columbia in 2008. He has freelanced for Foreign Affairs, Foreign Policy, and The Guardian, and his photographs have appeared in dozens of magazines and newspapers.

Jamila Trindle, 35, joined Foreign Policy Magazine in 2013 as a senior reporter covering the intersection of business and geopolitics. Previously, she was a reporter for The Wall Street Journal where she wrote about financial regulation and the economy, and a reporter/producer for the Nightly Business Report on PBS. Fluent in Chinese, she has freelanced, mostly from China, for NPR, Marketplace, The Guardian, PBS and Canadian Broadcasting Corp. She graduated magna cum lade from Amherst College in 2002.

2014-2015 Fellows

Nathan Becker, 27, is a copy editor and sports editor for The Wall Street Journal in New York where he was hired in 2009 as a breaking‐news reporter. He specializes in markets and finance news and has played a key editing role on topics ranging from Wall Street's big banks to the 2014 Winter Olympics in Sochi. After graduating from Truman State University in 2008, he interned as a business reporter for MarketWatch in San Francisco and Bloomberg News in Chicago.

Dan Bobkoff, 31, spent the last two years reporting on top business stories and trends for NPR News and the public radio show, Marketplace. Before working in New York City, he reported for public radio stations from Ohio and Massachusetts. He won the National Headliner Award and regional Edward R. Murrow award for his work as the Cleveland reporter on “Changing Gears,” a public radio project that explored the economic transformation of the industrial Midwest. He graduated from Wesleyan University in 2005.

Maria Danilova, 32, is the chief correspondent in the Kiev Bureau of The Associated Press. Born in Russia, she holds a B.A. in Linguistics from Moscow State University and an M.A. in Political Science from Central European University. She previously worked in Moscow for The Washington Post and The Moscow Times and joined the AP’s Moscow bureau in 2003.

Mark Garrison, 35, is a reporter and substitute host for Marketplace. Based in New York, he covers a variety of topics, including economics, media, transportation, retail, marketing and culture. His previous public radio experience includes newscasting for NPR, The Takeaway and New York’s WNYC, and he has worked for NBC, ABC and CNN. At CNN, he was senior editorial producer for Anderson Cooper 360o and part of the team that won Peabody and duPont Awards for coverage of Hurricane Katrina and the 2004 Asian tsunami, respectively. Garrison graduated from the University of Georgia with bachelor’s degrees in journalism and psychology.

Annalyn Kurtz, 27, a senior writer for CNNMoney, covers economic indicators and the Federal Reserve through breaking news articles, blog posts, data visualizations and “real people” slideshows. She is the winner of two SABEW Best in Business awards. As an adjunct lecturer at CUNY’s School of Journalism, she co‐teaches a course on covering the economy for graduate journalism students. While a student at Arizona State University, she interned at The Arizona Republic and Phoenix Business Journal. She graduated in 2008 with a B.A. in Journalism.

Alfred Lee, 29, is a staff reporter for Los Angeles Business Journal where he writes about legal issues in industries including real estate, retail, health care and manufacturing. The recipient of many awards, including two SABEW awards and L.A. Press Club’s first place in News Feature, he has also worked for Pasadena Star‐News and Los Angeles CityBeat and freelanced for National Public Radio, Los Angeles Review of Books and Flaunt. He is a graduate of The University of California, Los Angeles.

Angela Moon, 32, is a correspondent covering Wall Street for Thomson Reuters with a specialty in financial markets. She analyzes and reports breaking news and trends in stock trading, market structure, exchanges and derivatives. She is also a regular contributor for Thomson Reuters Insider TV. Born in Seoul, South Korea, she graduated with Honors from the University of Toronto with a B.A. in English Literature and International Studies. Prior to joining Thomson Reuters, she was a general news reporter for South Korea’s Yonhap News Agency.

Niamh Sweeney, 34, was working as a New York‐based freelance journalist for the Irish Times, Sunday Business Post, Fortune magazine, NPR, and Irish Independent when the Deputy Prime Minister of Ireland asked her to return to her native Ireland as his special adviser. A graduate of Trinity College Dublin, Dublin Institute of Technology and Columbia’s School of Journalism, she moved back to Dublin in 2012 to manage the Deputy PM’s press and advise on foreign and domestic policy matters. In addition to freelancing, she has reported for Bloomberg Radio, The Street, and RTE News (Ireland’s national broadcaster).

Halah Touryalai, 31, is a staff writer at Forbes where she writes features for the magazine and web articles for Forbes.com about wealth management, asset management, banking and economic and market trends. She is also the author of The New Wealth Doctors, Wall Street’s Hottest Career, an e‐book about the shortage of young financial advisors on Wall Street. Before joining Forbes in 2010, she reported and wrote for Registered Rep. magazine. At Pace University, where she majored in English, she was the news editor of the University’s official newspaper.

Erin Zlomek, 30, is a contributing writer for Bloomberg Businessweek and speed desk editor for Bloomberg News, where she analyzes SEC filings to filter market‐moving disclosures. After graduating from Virginia Tech in 2006 and completing the Pulliam Journalism Fellowship, she joined The Arizona Republic where she was a business reporter until she joined Bloomberg in 2010.

2013-2014 Fellows

Anjali Athavaley, 28, covers commercial real estate for the Greater New York section of The Wall Street Journal, where she started as an intern in 2006. A graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, she also interned at The Houston Chronicle, The Washington Post and the Miami Herald.

Emmanuel K. Dogbevi, 44, is founder and managing online editor of www.ghanabusinessnews.com, an online business news portal in Accra, Ghana, where his special interests are e‐waste, renewable energy and economic development. His articles on e‐waste dumping in Ghana have drawn international attention to the issue in that country. One of his articles on the topic has been included in a textbook (Cross Currents: Cultures, Communities, Technologies, 1st Edition, published by Cengage Learning in 2013). Winner of the Best Anti‐corruption Reporter Award of the Ghana Journalists Association in 2012, he holds a B.A. from the University of Ghana.

Roseanne Gerin, 45, has worked in China since 2007, most recently as senior news editor, China Radio International in Beijing. Previously, she was a staff writer for Washington Technology, a trade magazine about companies that sell IT and telecom products and services to the U.S. government. She holds degrees from Loyola College, Villanova University and Boston University.

Jeff Horwitz, 31, was hired by American Banker in 2009 after graduating from Columbia with an M.A. in Business Journalism. He has won five SABEW awards at American Banker for investigative and enterprise reporting, and was a finalist for a 2012 Loeb award. He previously worked for the Washington City Paper, the San Bernardino Sun and Legal Times, and freelanced in East Africa. He has also written stories for Slate, the Washington Post, Portfolio, the Atlantic, The Dallas Morning News and the Sacramento Bee.

Aaron Kessler, 33, is a staff writer for 100Reporters, a nonprofit journalism organization based in Washington, D.C. As a reporter for the Sarasota Herald‐Tribune, he partnered with ProPublica on an award‐winning investigation of contaminated Chinese drywall used in thousands of U.S. homes. He has previously covered subjects ranging from the housing and auto industries, to mortgage fraud, terrorist networks and other financial crimes. He has a B.A. from Washington University and an M.A. from the University of Missouri School of Journalism. His work has earned numerous national and regional awards, and he's twice been named a finalist for the Gerald Loeb Award.

Prem K. Khanal, 43, is associate editor of Republica English daily in Kathmandu, Nepal, which he joined in 2008 as business editor. Previously, he was chief of the business bureau at The Kathmandu Post. He graduated with an M.A. in Economics from Tribhuvan University in 1999 and served briefly as research officer for the Institute for Development Studies in Kathmandu before beginning his 12‐year career in journalism. His stories on corruption and the misuse of public funds earned him an Outstanding Performance Award in 2004 from Kantipur Publications, the largest media organization in Nepal.

Margot Sanger‐Katz, 33, is health care correspondent for National Journal, the Washington, D.C. politics and policy magazine. A graduate of Yale University and Columbia Journalism School, she previously wrote or edited for Concord (New Hampshire) Monitor, Yale Alumni Magazine and Legal Affairs magazine.

Spencer Soper, 39, is a senior business reporter for The Morning Call in Allentown, PA, where he has worked since 2005. Previously, he was reporter for newspapers in California and New York. He has won numerous journalism prizes, including a Gerald Loeb Award in 2012 for stories that exposed difficult working conditions in an Amazon.com warehouse near Allentown. He graduated with a B.A. in English from the State University of Albany, New York in 1995.

Peter Svensson, 40, is a technology writer for The Associated Press. Born and raised in Sweden, he has served in the country's military intelligence and been a U.N. peacekeeper in Croatia. He studied journalism at Stockholm University and photography and multimedia at New York University. His 2007 investigation uncovered how Comcast interfered with subscribers’ Internet traffic, fueling lawsuits and debates over Net Neutrality.

Amy Yee, 38, a freelance journalist based in New Delhi, India, focuses on development, business approaches to reducing poverty and stories with social impact. A graduate of Wellesley College, she got her start in business journalism in 1999 as a reporter for The Financial Times based in New York. In 2006, she moved to New Delhi and covered for the FT until 2008. As a freelancer, she writes for The New York Times, The Economist, The Wall Street Journal, The International Herald Tribune, The Lancet, Forbes and other publications. Two of her articles in the International Herald Tribune were selected as finalists for the U.S.‐based South Asian Journalists' Association.

2012-2013 Fellows

Kate Davidson, 36, has been the Michigan reporter with the public radio project Changing Gears, where her radio and web features explore the economic transformation of the industrial Midwest. She came to this beat two years ago from NPR, where she spent five years as a producer on Weekend All Things Considered. Before joining NPR in 2005, she reported and produced a radio documentary in Arizona about a controversial foster care program for Navajo children. Her piece won the Edward R. Murrow award for best network documentary. She earned a B.A. from Yale University in 1998 and the M.J. from Berkeley in 2003.

Gabriel Friedman, 34, reported on the subprime lending crisis and the stock option backdating scandal as a staff writer for the Los Angeles Daily Journal, a legal trade publication in California. For six years, he has written extensively about criminal and civil federal litigation. Previously, he reported on the environment for the Napa Valley Register and has freelanced for California Lawyer, The Los Angeles Times and Wired News, among others. He has received numerous awards including the L.A. Press Club's 2011 investigative prize and was a 2011 Loyola Law School Journalism Fellow. He received his B.A. in English Literature with honors in 2002 from the State University of New York at Binghamton.

Lewis Krauskopf, 39, joined Reuters in 2005 as a journalist covering the U.S. healthcare industry and was promoted to U.S. Healthcare Team Leader in 2007, helping coordinate coverage of a team of reporters for this global news organization. Previously, he was business reporter for The Record (Bergen County, N.J.) where for five years he covered the pharmaceutical industry. After graduating in 1995 magna cum laude from Duke University, where he worked on the college daily newspaper, he took a job as copy editor for The Virginian‐Pilot and became general assignment reporter in 1997. He has received numerous awards from New Jersey Press Association and Society of Professional Journalists.

Nandagopal Jayakumar Nair, 28, is assistant news editor for CNBC‐TV18 in Mumbai, India. In charge of driving editorial content, he heads the news channel’s 14‐member evening desk team and oversees production of shows, including India Business Hour, What’s Hot and Markets Today. He is part of the core team that is establishing CNBC‐ TV18’s online presence via Facebook, Twitter, YouTube and the channel’s website – moneycontrol.com. He holds a B.A. in English Language and Literature from Mar Ivanious College and a post‐graduate diploma in broadcast journalism from Asian College of Journalism in Chennai, where in 2006 he won awards for outstanding work in covering politics and deprivation.

Charlotte Raab de Miranda, 42, is New York‐based correspondent for Agence France‐Presse covering U.S. business, high‐tech and media industries, and global macroeconomic news. Born and raised in southern France and Paris, she studied at the Centre de Formation des Journalistes in Paris and graduated in 1991. She interned from Madrid for El Pais and from London for the AFP before taking her first job as sub‐editor for AFP in its Paris headquarters in 1991. In 2001, she moved to the AFP’s Washington office where she reported on U.S. politics, and has reported from New York since 2008. Her stories appear routinely in print and on the websites of the major newspapers in France, such as Le Monde and L’Express, and as far away as in media published in Hong Kong, India, London and Dubai.

Mica Rosenberg, 33, has been based since 2008 in Mexico City, where as senior correspondent she covers commodities, energy and general news for Reuters. Previously, she was in Guatemala and reported from across the region, covering earthquakes in Haiti and Chile, a coup in Honduras and elections in Central America. In 2009, she was part of the team that won a SABEW award for the Mexico bureau’s coverage of the outbreak of swine flu. Fluent in Spanish, she has a Masters degree
from Columbia’s School of International and Public Affairs and a B.A. from Barnard College. Between college and graduate school, she worked at the Washington‐based think tank, the Inter‐American Dialogue, which promotes U.S.‐Latin America relations.

Barrett Sheridan, 28, was hired by Bloomberg Businessweek in 2010 and promoted after less than one year to become the publication’s youngest senior editor. He oversees technology coverage for the magazine and website, managing a team of reporters, designers and photographers. He graduated Phi Beta Kappa from Stanford University in 2006, and began his journalism career as research assistant to Fareed Zakaria on his book, “The Post‐American World.” He joined Newsweek in 2008 as associate web editor for Newsweek International and launched the InternationaList, a section of foreign news analysis. As staff writer, he composed features on global affairs, technology and business. Previously, he worked for the World Bank on Latin American economic development issues.

Katerina Sokou, 37, is head of international financial news for Kathimerini, the Athens, Greece, daily newspaper, where she has led coverage of the international response to the financial crisis since 2008. In that position, she manages a team of five journalists and has become a local source of information on the Greek crisis for the BBC, The Times, City A.M., L’Espresso and countless foreign journalists via Twitter. After graduating in 1998 from University of Warwick, UK, with an M.A. in International Studies, she began as a trainee covering financial news in 1999 for newspaper To Vima, where she spent the first ten years of her journalism career. A Greek citizen, she studied at King’s College London and earned her
history diploma from University of Ioannina, Greece.

Jaclyn Trop, 29, is an automotive reporter for The Detroit News, which she joined in 2008 after graduating with an M.S. from Columbia Journalism School. Previously, she reported for weekly community newspapers in Boston and held internships at Rolling Stone, The Independent on Sunday and Inc. magazine. She is the winner of numerous awards, including SABEW’s “Best in Business” contest for her story on the bankruptcy of Borders Group Inc. In addition to her Master’s degree from Columbia she holds a B.S. in Journalism from Boston University .

Rachel Wehrspann, 32, producer for Bloomberg Television, is responsible for planning coverage of business events and field producing live television interviews and shows. She recently traveled to Greece for a series of reports on the debt crisis and to Switzerland for coverage of the World Economic Forum. She began her career as a writer for a local CBS affiliate and won the International Radio and Television Society Fellowship in 2000. After graduating with a B.A. in journalism from
Purdue University in 2001, she worked for CNN, where she wrote segments for veteran journalists such as Lou Dobbs and Myron Kandel. In 2006, she joined CNBC as a producer for “Closing Bell with Maria Bartiromo.” In 2009, she coordinated Bloomberg's partnership with the Aspen Institute to develop the program, “Capitalism and the Future.”