Cross-Registration Fall 2017

Graduate students from other Columbia Divisions/Schools looking to register for Fall 2017 classes at the Journalism School must follow the steps outlined below. All classes listed below are 3-point courses (unless otherwise specified). Detailed information, including course descriptions, has been listed. 

Cross-registration will open Monday, August 21, at 10 a.m. and will close Friday, September 15, at 10 a.m. To cross-register, students must submit this form.

 

Class Offerings for Fall 2017

Writing About the Arts

3 points

David Hajdu

Mondays, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., September 11 - October 23

The arts in their innumerable forms are central to 21st-century life. This class prepares journalists to report and write on the arts with rigor, depth, clarity, and a due quality of artfulness. Students will study how the arts function as a reflection of culture, an economic engine, and an influence on politics. Assignments include arts news, feature writing, and criticism. 

 

Opinion Writing 

3 points

Jelani Cobb

Wednesdays, 6 a.m. to 9 p.m., September 6 - October 18

The focus of this class is on the writing of editorials, but op-ed pieces and blogs are covered as well. Focus is on the importance of developing an intellectual framework, using reporting in the formation of opinions, and checking facts. The essential nature of original reporting in the formation of opinions is emphasized throughout the course. Another area of focus is the development of a distinct voice and clear and lively writing.

 

Writing About the Arts

3 points

David Hajdu

Mondays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., October 30 - December 11

The arts in their innumerable forms are central to 21st-century life. This class prepares journalists to report and write on the arts with rigor, depth, clarity, and a due quality of artfulness. Students will study how the arts function as a reflection of culture, an economic engine, and an influence on politics. Assignments include arts news, feature writing, and criticism.

 

Off the News 

3 points

Mike Hoyt

Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., October 31 - December 12

Story ideas can spring straight from the brows of editors, but the best ones tend to emerge from two faithful sources—a well-covered beat, or from the news itself. This course is about that latter category—reporting off the news, on deadline. In this class, we will organize our reporting to advance the story as quickly as we can, and publish the edited results on The Brooklyn Ink website (Links to an external site.) Links to an external site..What kind of things? They might be big or small, expected or unexpected, global or local. Maybe a gang shooting in Brooklyn—who are these people and what is the backdrop? Maybe a presidential election in Pakistan—what questions does this raise in our Pakistani neighborhoods? Maybe the consumer confidence number takes a jump: How can we localize that? Maybe a school closes or a restaurant gets a C from the health department or another hurricane is approaching or a politician unexpectedly endorses the NYPD’s stop-and-frisk policy. Or… Much of this class will be about brainstorming—sometimes together, sometimes individually—around two issues: What news of the day raises the kind of questions that The Brooklyn Ink wants to address? And, once we have our story ideas, how do we go about adding context and new facts via our own original reporting, plus Web and library research? We will work on small group projects and individual stories, with rigorous editing. We will hear from a couple of guests who are good at this kind of reporting, too.

 

Memoir Writing

3 points

Jonathan Weiner 

Wednesdays, 9:00 p.m. to 12:00 p.m., October 25 - December 13

All great memoirs share the same secret. Their authors have learned the power of basic narrative principles. The aim of this course is to master those principles, to study them in the work of others, and to apply them to your own. The first few sessions are spent in an overview of the memoir form, discussing how to recognize, report, structure and write stories that move confidently through time, place and character. The remaining weeks proceed through a series of more specific technical issues using dialogue, choosing and depicting characters (including your own), compressing and expanding time, managing transitions, providing context, maintaining the highest standards of accuracy, establishing a voice. Beyond the regular readings, the main requirement is to find one good personal story idea and then develop it in a series of short sketches, gradually working your way deeper into the narrative form as the semester progresses.

 

Journalism of Death & Dying

3 points

Ari Goldman 

Tuesdays, 10 a.m. to 1 p.m., October 31 - December 12

Just about every journalist has to cover death, whether a fireman’s funeral, a fatal car crash, a memorial service or a simple obituary of a community leader. This seven-week course will equip students to cover end-of-life issues, including terminal illness, murders, suicides and fatal accidents in both the personal and public spheres. With the help of experts on trauma, students will discuss best practices about interviewing the bereaved and survivors. The reading list will include some of the great journalism on death and dying, including classic obituaries and accounts of disasters such as 9/11, Katrina, and the Indian Ocean tsunami. The class will also look at some of the digital media outlets that are increasingly being used to memorialize the dead. Finally, the class will explore the cross-cultural and cross-theological practices surrounding death. Over the course of the semester, each student will visit a public memorial and a funeral home and write a story from each venue. There will be weekly research, writing and re-writing assignments with the goal of producing three 1,200-word articles.

 

Narrative Writing

3 points

Jonathan Weiner 

Thursdays, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., October 26 - December 14

All of the best stories in journalism, whether as short as a column or as long as a book, share the same basic narrative principles, and the aim of this course is to master those principles, to study them in the work of others, and to apply them to your own. The first few sessions are spent in an overview of the narrative form, discussing how to recognize, report, structure and write stories that move confidently through time, place and character. The remaining weeks proceed through a series of more specific technical issues such as using dialogue, choosing and depicting characters, compressing and expanding time, managing transitions, providing historical context, establishing a voice.

 

Deadline Writing

3 points

Amy Singer 

Mondays, 6 p.m. to 9 p.m., October 30 - December 11

Do you want to be a foreign correspondent? Cover the courts? Write magazine features? No matter what your aspirations, the ability to put together an accurate, clearly-written story on deadline is essential to achieving your goals. Working on deadline is equal parts mindset and technique. Both can be acquired with practice, and you’ll get lots of it in this class. You’ll write at least one story a week and will get detailed guidance and feedback throughout the process. Assignments will replicate the sorts of deadline stories you would be likely to cover for a mainstream media organization — live events, second-day stories and short features. You will have the opportunity to cover stories from your Reporting class beats, thus building on the sources you developed in the first half of the semester. In class, we will brainstorm story ideas and angles and discuss strategies for reporting and writing when the clock is ticking. You’ll learn to turn deadline anxiety into adrenaline, to produce standout stories — and to have fun in the process.

 

 

 

Registration Details

For the most part, spots in J-School classes are assigned to non-Journalism graduate students on a space available basis (with top priority given to IMC SIPA students).

To request cross-registration in a Journalism School course, please complete this form.

The form will be active as of Monday, August 21, at 10 a.m.

Please note that this is only a REQUEST and we cannot guarantee your request will be accommodated.

Cross-registration request forms are processed on a first come, first served basis.

If your form is submitted correctly you will receive a request confirmation e-mail within 24 hours. Please remember to include the @columbia.edu after your UNI.

You will NOT receive an e-mail from my office saying that your request was granted or not granted.

To learn if your request was granted, you must keep checking your class schedule on the web. All requests remain on file during the cross-registration period (August 21 - September 15 at 10 a.m.).

You do not need to submit multiple forms for the same cross-registration request. If I am able to grant requests I do it as soon as possible but sometimes it takes days for a space to open in a class. Sometimes the space never opens up.

Please remember that you are submitting a cross-registration REQUEST. There is no guarantee that I will be able to approve your request. Until you see a change reflected on your class schedule on STUDENT SERVICES ONLINE, your request has not been approved.

If you have more than one course for which you want to be considered, please submit a separate form for each class.

Also, please be certain that you are not requesting a class that conflicts with any of your other classes.

Direct any questions to Melanie Huff.