Classes | School of Journalism

Classes

Please note: The classes listed here represent recent offerings at the Journalism School. These include M.S., M.S. in Data Journalism and M.A. courses. Choices vary each semester depending on faculty availability and other considerations. Classes described now may change or be dropped to make room for new additions. We cannot promise that students will gain a seat in any specific class.

Audio I

This course teaches fundamental and advanced techniques of field reporting and writing in audio or radio media. Emphasis is on writing clearly and conversationally, with integration of recorded voices and natural sound. Students will pitch, report, write and produce compelling, public radio style pieces, including newscasts, news stories, features and interviews. They will be trained in state-of-the-industry recording equipment and editing software. Students will receive detailed, one-on-one editing and will publish their work in on-demand digital audio formats. The writing and technical skills taught in this course are intended to serve students well in any medium.

This class (or Audio II for students with prior experience) is a prerequisite for those interested in pitching a full audio master’s project.

Multiple instructors teach sections of this class.

Photojournalism I

This course covers the basics of photojournalism, including DSLR camera operation, workflow, post production, captioning and keywording using Adobe software. Students will have weekly assignments photographing and editing news, portrait and multi-picture feature stories.   Fieldwork will be supported by discussions of contemporary examples of photojournalism and the ethical and legal issues of visual reporting.  Students will leave the class able to identify visual opportunities in the field, and be equipped to shoot single image and multi picture slideshows for print and internet publications.  Note: There is a $50 equipment fee associated with this class for students planning to use our equipment. Students who bring their own dSLRs and lenses will not be charged this fee.\\ Multiple instructors teach sections of this class.

Photojournalism II (Offered in the fall only)

This course assumes basic knowledge of DSLR camera operation and basic knowledge of Adobe photo processing software.  Students will learn how to make multi image photo essays incorporating techniques of reportage, still-life and portrait photography.  Fieldwork will be supported by discussions of contemporary examples of photojournalism and the ethical and legal issues of visual reporting. Students will learn best archiving practices, advanced Adobe software, and business and pricing standards including day rates, usage fees, and copyright.  Students will leave the class able to identify visual opportunities in the field, and be equipped to produce single image and multi picture slideshows for print and internet publications.

Note: There is a $50 equipment fee associated with this class for students planning to use our equipment.  Students who bring their own dSLRs and lenses will not be charged this fee.

Multiple instructors teach sections of this class.

Video 1/Broadcast

This class is for students interested in broadcast news. In this course, you’ll learn the basics of video journalism as it is practiced in broadcast newsrooms: gathering sound and picture simultaneously, the fundamentals of exposure and composition, the grammar of video, writing to picture, selecting sound bites and the basic concepts of non-linear editing. By the end of the course students should have a foundational understanding of the basic skills involved in video news gathering and the ability to produce short-form video news pieces.

Video 1/Web & Documentary

This class is for students interested in producing short-form videos, of the type that appear on web sites such as Vice.com or NYTimes.com. In this course, you’ll learn the basics of video journalism: gathering sound and picture simultaneously; the fundamentals of exposure and composition; the grammar of video, writing to picture, selecting sound bites, the basic concepts of non-linear editing. By the end of the course, you should have a foundational understanding of the basic skills involved in video storytelling and the ability to produce short-form video pieces.

Video 2

If you already have a solid foundation in video, you may request admission to this module, which will give you the chance to develop a more sophisticated understanding of, and approach to, the medium. We’ll delve into the elements necessary for producing compelling stories; teach you how to light and shoot sequences and well-framed interviews; discuss the practical ethical and legal considerations of working in video; and help you develop rapport with subjects. You may request this module during balloting, but when you get to campus, you’ll be required to demonstrate the ability to shoot video interviews and action scenes; identify and use sound bites; and edit a short story using pictures and sound. Those not qualified will be placed in Video 1. For more information, contact Prof. Betsy West.